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Recipe for sweet sopressata
by William A McCallMy Sopressata.org Contributor
Recipe for sweet sopressata: As you probably know "sweet" means "not hot".

Batch 30 Lbs Pork Shoulder Butts
Sppressata % Lbs grams oz
Starter Culture* 0.03 0.009 3.90 0.137
Nutmeg 0.07 0.022 9.87 0.348
Cracked Black Pepper 0.14 0.043 19.48 0.687
Corriander 0.07 0.022 9.87 0.348
Fresh Garlic 0.01 0.003 1.56 0.055
Modern Cure 0.24 0.072 32.46 1.145
Sugar 0.67 0.200 90.90 3.206
Salt 2.75 0.825 374.55 13.212
TOT ING. 4.66 1.20 542.59 19.139
* Lactobacillus plantarum
 
1. Trim the surface fat down to the menbrane from the pork butts and reserve. Remove the bone.
2. Remove the layer of connective tissue (membrane) down to the meat and discard.
3. Cut the meat into strips and grind through a 1/4 inch hole plate. Include the reserved fat. (some may prefer a 3/8 inch grind)
4. Mix in all the ingredients by hand (or machine). Refrigerate overnight. This allows the salt and nitrite to equally distribute as well as chill the meat for better stuffing.
5. Stuff into beef middle casings into about 32 inch lenghts. Portion by tying off about 8 inch pisces with cotton twine. Leave a loop at one end to hang. It's helpful to tie with a piece of string in the middle of each piece to maintain shape for drying. Use a stuffer that can be packed tightly to prevent any air voids in the sausages.
6. Ferment for 48 hrs at 80 degrees. DO NOT FERMENT WITHOUT STARTER CULTURE.
    a. I recommend spraying a mold solution on the sausage before fermentation.
    b. I put the sausage on a rack and covered the rack with a sheet of 1 mil plastic. For heat, I used a warming tray with a pan of water on it. You want to see a   slight fog on the plastic film. A handheld thermometer poked though the film will help monitor Temp. 78-82 F is fine.
    c. Following fermentation, it's fine to wash the mold off or a slight film of yeast may appear which need to be washed off. Warm water in a sink is fine.
7. Hang in your basment for 2-3 weeks until about 25% weight loss. Some may prefer 30%, but too dry for me. Looking for about 65-70% humidity. Summer is best for this.
8. When dried to your preference, soak the sausage in warm water for about 20 minutes. Remove the casing now. It's annoying later. Let the sausage dry at room temp for 30 minutes and vacume package and refrigerate. Refirgeration is not necessary, but better. Oil packing works too, but I'm not a fan.
9. Sausage will be better after about a month when the moisture fully equilibrates.
10. I bought my casings, modern cure, Lactobacillus starter culture and Penicillium mold at sausagemakers.com.
    a. Casings are well packed in salt. Soak them in a sink and fully rinse off all the salt inside and out.
    b. Modern cure is 93.25% salt, so the total recipe has 3% salt. The rest is sodium nitrite. Don't use more than you need.
    c. Sugar works just as good and dextrose for Lactobacillus starter culture. The level used should be just enough to get the pH to 4.8-5.0. The salami will not be sour at this pH.

Louie Pascuzzi Sopressata Easter Pie
Recipe as written by Mary Pascuzzi, 1994

Easter PieThis recipe is for 3 pies.

Use 3 lbs. fresh or frozen  bread or pizza dough for crusts Cover dough with smooth towel when rising When rising, rub oil on the dough so it will not crack when stretching. After rising, divide and roll into 6 pieces, 3 tops and 3 bottoms

Create Ricotta cheese filling:
Mix 4lbs. Ricotta whole milk cheese with 2 eggs, 1lb. shredded Mozzarella, 5 oz. shredded parmagiano romano cheese, add salt and pepper

Meat Ingredients:
3/4 lb. cooked ham, 3/4 lb. sweet cappicola, 2 thinly sliced sopressatas,
1 dozen hard boiled eggs, sliced

Making pies:
Grease and flour pie plates and add bottom layer of dough.
Cover bottom dough with one layer of ham (be sure to cover bottom as the ham layer keeps the moisture away from the bottom crust.) Spread a layer of ricotta cheese mix Cover cheese mix with a layer of boiled eggs Add one layer of sopressata over the eggs Cover sopressata with another layer of ricotta cheese mix Add another layer of the sliced boiled eggs Add one layer of sopressata over the eggs Finish the filling with one layer of cappicola Cover with the top pie crust, puncture top to remove steam Bake at 350 for 45 minutes, with 10 minutes to go , brush top of pie with beaten egg

After pies have cooled, remove and turn upside down on board so bottoms
won’t get soggy….that is it, good luck.

Sopressata Recipe- How To Make Sopressata
By Kyle Phillips, About.com Guide

Larry asked, much too long ago, if I had a recipe for sopressata. Like many other Italian words, sopressata's meaning varies considerably from place to place. In much of the Peninsula it's a raw, pork-based salami that's been squashed slightly during the curing phase and is thus flat; the spicing varies from place to place according to local tradition. In Tuscany, on the other hand...
See This Link To Full Article And Recipe

How to Make Sopressata Salami
By Patricia Bryant Resnick, eHow Contributing Writer

Sopressata Salami (also called Supersata) is a traditional Italian cured meat product. It is usually a flattened shape, up to a foot wide, and can be several feet long. It can also be round, but the name refers to the widespread custom of pressing it with a heavy weight during the curing. It is a popular salami, but not to everyone's taste. It is usually produced in the autumn when the family's hog is butchered. That's the fancy version. The original version made use of all the cuts that were left over for the butcher's family after the good stuff had been sold. At its most basic, it used all the bits and pieces that were available to a thrifty and hungry family; it was thought of as "poor man's salami." Most sopressata is made entirely with pork, but it's not uncommon to use a small portion of beef to fill out the ingredients.
See This Link To Full Article And Recipe

Cooking "The Babbo Cookbook"
Salumi Weekend: Sopressata By David

When I think of salumi, I always think of sopressata first.  I have great memories of eating it even before I knew of prosiutto.  Sopressata was always cheaper and it plays an important part in the Easter Eve celebration for my family.  One of the traditional dishes served on Holy Saturday is a spaghetti pie made of cooked pasta, ricotta, eggs, and black pepper.  It's baked in a roasting pan and served a room temprature with slices of soppressata.  I can picture my brother and me as kids using our teeth to separate the sopressata casing from the meat and chewing the garlicky, peppery meat with wedges of spaghetti pie.  So when it came to choosing a dry sausage to make at home, I immediately thought of sopressata.
See This Link To Full Article And Recipe

From Cosa Bolle in Pentola, the Newsletter
By Howie Hart

Last night I attended a home made wine and Sopressata competition and dinner in Niagara Falls(see post in WLDG). There were many varieties of Sopressata, but were simply divided into hot or mild categories. I did manage to find 2 Sopressata recipes on the internet, but was wondering if anybody here had other recipes, comments or recommendations.
See This Link To Full Article And Recipe